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Dialogue

Wednesday, February 17, 2021

Truth Commissions as an Antidote to Unrest: Where Dialogue and Transparency Promote Reconciliation

by Oladeji Tiamiyu ’20   In recent months, America has experienced significant social upheaval, ranging from the nation-wide protests in the aftermath of the killing of George Floyd to the attempted insurrection of the Capitol that led to the deaths of 5 individuals. In July 2020, Boston, San Francisco, and Philadelphia established truth commissions in… More

Wednesday, November 4, 2020

What we’ve learned from the election – no matter who wins 

Election Day has come and gone.  At this moment, we sit with anxious uncertainty about the outcome in the Presidential race, as key states continue to count the millions of legitimately cast votes that remain.  The color-coded maps are ubiquitous but incomplete, the pundits spin out endless speculative scenarios.  And we wait.  … More

Thursday, October 29, 2020

Reflecting on the Journey of “Thanks for Listening”

When we launched the “Thanks for Listening” podcast in the fall of 2018, our goal was to explore what seemed like deep and growing political polarization in the U.S., and to find out what was being done about it. We wanted to be able to tell a hopeful story about people and organizations who are working to “bridge the partisan divide in America,” as we said in the opening of each episode. And for both of the authors, hope was something we needed; the political and social dynamics at play at the time seemed to be posing dire stress tests to some of the basic premises of our work. … More

Thursday, July 30, 2020

Only a Game: How Elements of “Gamification” Can Enrich Online Dialogue

In light of the pandemic, dialogue practitioners are finding inventive ways to not only transfer dialogue online but also reimagine how traditionally in-person activities can be conducted online more effectively. A new way of making remote dialogue more engaging is to incorporate game-like elements to make the online experience more life-like. Carla Luna talks about how in her new blog.… More

Wednesday, April 8, 2020

Finding the contours of our virtual lives

In-person interaction is now largely unavailable to us. Can digital connections ever be as rich? In visual art, the term “negative space” refers to the space around the subject of an image. M.C. Escher’s Sky and Water I provides a vivid example: the birds at the top of this graphic print start out as positive… More

Thursday, February 6, 2020

Engaging Deep Differences Online

Originally published on the Indisputably blog as part of the Theory-of-Change Symposium . You can find all the submissions for the symposium here.   As we approach the next election, we continue to confront important challenges about engaging across deeply felt differences. Our country remains polarized, and many feel disconnected from those whose views differ… More

Wednesday, November 7, 2018

Thanks for Listening!

We are pleased to announce that the Harvard Negotiation & Mediation Clinical Program has been awarded a grant from the American Arbitration Association International Centre for Dispute Resolution Foundation to fund a new podcast series called Thanks for Listening, which will launch in early November 2018.… More

Wednesday, October 17, 2018

Lessons Learned: Facilitating a Conversation about Remembrance

by Niharika Singh ’18 When Zikaron BaSalon first asked me to facilitate a discussion about Holocaust Remembrance on Holocaust Memorial Day, the task seemed easy even though the subject matter was weighty. After all, many people who were similarly inexperienced in leading group discussions had successfully hosted similar events with Zikaron BaSalon in the past. Moreover,… More

Friday, May 26, 2017

To Dialogue: Moving Towards Conversation About Refugee Resettlement in Maine

A team of Harvard Law School Negotiators students worked throughout the Spring 2017 semester with Catholic Charities Maine on a new project entitled, “To Dialogue: Moving Towards Conversation About Refugee Resettlement in Maine”.… More

Monday, April 3, 2017

Why I Will Take a Trump Supporter to Coffee

I began to rethink my own involvement during this administration. I will not stop going to protests, or writing letters to senators, but I will also turn the other cheek and, engage with those who cause me outrage. The centerpiece of the average Trump supporter’s belief is an inability to empathize deeply with the plight of others. I will engage genuinely and openly with those who make my face flush – and that will be my resistance.… More

Wednesday, December 7, 2016

Harvard Negotiation and Mediation Clinical Program (HNMCP) 10th Anniversary Symposium Explores a Dynamic Field and Growing Impact

On November 5, 2016, the Harvard Negotiation and Mediation Clinical Program (HNMCP) at Harvard Law School celebrated its 10th Anniversary with a public symposium that was both retrospective and prospective, addressing the clinic’s foundational focus on dispute systems design, as well as looking at the role of facilitation and political dialogue. The symposium was hosted… More

Wednesday, December 7, 2016

Syllabus for “Political Dialogue in Polarizing Times: Election 2016” Now Publicly Posted

The Harvard Negotiation and Mediation Clinical Program (HNMCP) has made its new syllabus on political dialogue publicly available on the Berkman Center’s class tools website, H20. Inspired by the success of our reading group on Political Dialogue in Polarizing Times: Election 2016, HNMCP Director and Clinical Professor Bob Bordone ‘97 and Assistant Director and Lecturer Rachel Viscomi ’01… More

Wednesday, November 16, 2016

A Facilitated Conversation: HNMCP Creates a New Learning Tool on Bridging Hard Divides

In a world where genuine dialogue across deep political divides seems ever more rare, trained facilitators can help create spaces for citizens to engage in challenging conversations that promote mutual learning and build empathy. To answer the need for educational resources in this area, the Harvard Negotiation and Mediation Clinical Program (HNMCP) has created a new… More

Thursday, November 10, 2016

Morning in America: November 9, 2016

by Heather Kulp First published on Harvard Law Today You roll out of bed, seeking coffee and your morning news. Groggily, you realize it’s Wednesday morning, November 9—the day after the presidential election. S/he’s won. You may be thrilled. You may not be. Either way, you have to go to work/the dinner table/a church potluck/your… More

Monday, May 16, 2016

Reimagining the Presidential Debates

During the last election cycle, I wrote an op-ed with my colleague, Heather Kulp, noting that the so-called Presidential debates had devolved into something more akin to football matches.  With the emphasis on entertainment, strict time clocks, and ubiquitous analysis of who “won,” the prospect of any thoughtful discussion of the issues seemed to fade… More

Wednesday, March 9, 2016

May the Force Be With You

I love negotiation theory. In fact, I hope to make a long career out of teaching others how to negotiate effectively. But every time someone asks me about my future profession, their eyes glaze over as I describe how one can use empathy and self-awareness to get what he or she wants. I have discovered… More

Wednesday, March 2, 2016

Facilitation Challenges: Navigating the Space Between Neutrality and Identity

As a brand-new student in the art of facilitation, one of my first lessons was in the importance of maintaining neutrality on the substance of discussion and, relatedly, in the value of calling in an outside facilitator to a sensitive discussion. The theory underlying this concept is that, by remaining neutral as to content, the… More

Wednesday, February 24, 2016

Resetting Broken Bones: Real Talk at Harvard Law School

As long as we are on earth, the love that unites us will bring us suffering by our very contact with one another, because this love is the resetting of a Body of broken bones. Even saints cannot live with saints on this earth without some anguish, without some pain at the differences that come between them. … More

Wednesday, February 24, 2016

Reflections on Real Talk: An Introduction

By Robert C. Bordone, Jon Hanson, Jacob Lipton, and Sam W. Straus   HNMCP is proud to announce the launch of a new series on our blog sharing the experiences of facilitators in our new student initiative, Real Talk. In fall 2015 the Harvard Negotiation & Mediation Clinical Program (HNMCP),in collaboration with the Systemic Justice… More

Saturday, February 13, 2016

Real Talk – An Introduction

The Harvard Negotiation & Mediation Clinical Program (HNMCP) and the Systemic Justice Project (SJP) proudly launch a four-part blog series, with each of the works stemming from the program’ joint initiative called Real Talk. The Real Talk pilot program, an initiative for dialogue, diversity, equity, and inclusion, placed twenty student participants in four small groups… More